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Intellect

BYU offers free children's book, play review database

The "Children's Book and Play Review" produced by Brigham Young University's Harold B. Lee Library, Department of Teacher Education and Department of Theatre and Media Arts is a free database that reviews fiction, non-fiction, plays and media intended for young people.

Parents, teachers, librarians and theatre professionals can use this database to find quality materials for children and adolescents. The database has evolved from a print periodical to a full-text searchable database with enhanced search features, including authors, titles, subjects, genres, reading/interest levels and ratings.

Available online since October 2002, the database contains more than 500 book and play reviews of materials produced in the last five years. Media reviews will begin shortly, with 50 retrospective movie reviews and 10 reviews of current releases. Reviews of electronic educational productions are on the horizon. New reviews are added weekly.

Individuals may access the database at http://cbpr.lib.byu.edu/. For more information, contact Marsha Broadway at 801-422-6685 or marsha_broadway@byu.edu.

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