Skip to main content
Intellect

BYU museum hosts seminar, receptions on Pectol-Lee artifacts Feb. 6-7

The Museum of Peoples and Cultures at Brigham Young University will feature the Pectol-Lee artifacts from the Capitol Reef National Park area of Utah with a seminar and public receptions Friday and Saturday, Feb. 6 and 7, at the BYU Conference Center and at the museum.

Two receptions, where visitors can inspect artifacts in the exhibit, will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday and 5 to 7 p.m. on Saturday at the museum, located at 700 N. 100 East in Provo.

The seminar will be held Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Room 2254 at BYU's Conference Center, located at 770 E. University Parkway in Provo.

Curators from the museum and archaeologists from BYU, as well as representatives from the Navajo Nation, Paiute Indian Tribe, the Utah Division of Indian Affairs and others will discuss different aspects of the collection during the seminar.

The Pectol and Lee families privately collected the artifacts in the early 20th century. The collection once held the famous hide shields, which were recently repatriated to the Navajo.

The artifacts are currently on loan to the museum for research and exhibition. “In Search of Relics: The Pectol-Lee Collection of Artifacts from Capitol Reef,” will close in April 2004.

For more information, contact the museum at (801) 422-0020 or mpc-sec@ad.byu.edu.

Writer: Thomas Grover

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
July 28, 2021
A team of BYU biologists has been tracking dragonflies around the world, from Vietnam to the islands of Vanuatu. Their goal is to piece together the first-ever phylogenic tree of all 6,300 known species and their ancestors.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 27, 2021
Amy Jensen, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications, delivered Tuesday’s forum address. She spoke on why our bodies matter in today’s digital world. More specifically, she explained that being more intentional about how we use and where we place our bodies can help us grow and cultivate a deeper understanding of others.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 25, 2021
New research finds that children who engaged with princess culture were more likely to hold progressive views about women and subscribe less to attitudes of toxic masculinity.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=