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Intellect

BYU Men's, Women's Chorus plan concert Nov. 6 and 8

The Brigham Young University School of Music presents the Women's Chorus and Men's Chorus in concert Thursday and Saturday, Nov. 6 and 8, at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

Tickets at $9 with $3 off with a BYU or student ID are available through the Fine Arts Ticket Office, (801) 378-4322 or at www.byu.edu/hfac.

The concert boasts a wide variety of music for both men's and women's voices.

"The audience will hear a of variety of musical styles and historical periods," said conductor Vicki McMurray, "everything from the Renaissance to a piece written in the last two years."

Men's Chorus conductor Rosalind Hall also has chosen a diverse program.

"As always, the Men's Chorus tries to present programs that are extremely varied," Hall said. "I always set the goal of singing the best of all kinds of music."

McMurray, a graduate student, will direct the women in singing psalms and other religious music, songs from the Jewish tradition, and two variations on a theme of "holding on."

"The first 'Hold On' is from 'The Secret Garden,'" McMurray said. "The second is an African American spiritual. The same title, different songs, but a similar message."

Hall said the Men's Chorus' portion of the performance will be similarly eclectic, with very serious pieces, hymns and spirituals, and a large production number incorporating choral singing, solos, dancing and accompaniment by BYU's Jazz Legacy Dixieland Band.

Hall said the production number will consist of music from Walt Disney's "The Jungle Book." She said it was arranged for the Men's Chorus and the Dixieland Band by Lyle Durland. The piece has been choreographed by Megan Sanborn Jones.

"It will come complete with Congo drums and animal noises and lots of wonderful melodies," she said.

Both the Men's and Women's Choruses have worked hard in preparation for the concert as part of a busy performing season.

"This has been an exciting year already," McMurray said. "The Women's Chorus participated as part of the choir that sang at the General Relief Society Meeting. It really created a lot of positive momentum."

Hall says the Men's Chorus rehearses every day and performs on average about every two weeks.

"These young men are extremely committed," she said. "They fulfill their commitments over and over."

McMurray is sure the 180-member Women's Chorus will have something for everyone.

"They're an important choral experience at BYU," she said.

And Hall says audiences consistently respond well to the Men's Chorus because of the members' appealing, powerful, and colorful voices.

"I think one of the things that sets the BYU Men's Chorus apart is its sheer size," Hall said. "Imagine--200 young men singing together. It's something that to most people is irresistible. And they can sing well on top of that."

For more information about the Men's Chorus and Women's Chorus concert, contact Vicki McMurray at (801) 226-6662 or Rosalind Hall at 422-2272.

Writer: Rachel M. Sego

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