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Intellect

BYU MBA program leaps ahead in Financial Times rankings

The Marriott School of Management jumped 26 spots in the 2005 Financial Times rankings of the top 100 global MBA programs. The London-based paper ranked Brigham Young University's Marriott School 49th overall.

The school was also listed among the top 10 North American schools for the highest percentage salary increase. This distinction is based on the percentage increase in salary from the beginning of the MBA to three years after graduation and included data from the paper's 2003, 2004 and 2005 surveys.

"We are continuing to develop a leadership position as a top international school of management," says Ned C. Hill, Marriott School dean. "We are grateful for this recognition and owe a lot to the tremendous students and graduates that are growing our reputation."

The Financial Times has ranked business schools for the past seven years. The Marriott School has been included in the last five. The paper's criteria measure a school's strength in three areas-purchasing power in the marketplace, diversity of experience and the school's research qualities. The rankings are compiled from two questionnaires and an independent assessment of research. One questionnaire was completed by alumni who graduated three years ago. A second questionnaire was completed by each school. The paper evaluated business schools on six continents for its 2005 MBA rankings published 24 January.

"Although the rankings don't drive our actions, they are a nice recognition for what we've accomplished," says James D. Stice, MBA program director and professor of accounting. "The Financial Times report increases our visibility to those who are considering getting an MBA or those hiring our graduates."

The Marriott School is located at BYU, the largest privately owned, church-sponsored university in the United States. The school has nationally recognized programs in accounting, business management, public management, information systems, organizational behavior and entrepreneurship.

Writer: Chad Little

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