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Intellect

BYU law professor named Fulbright Distinguished Chair in Austria

J. Clifton Fleming Jr., holder of the Ernest L. Wilkinson Chair at the J. Reuben Clark Law School at Brigham Young University, has been appointed to the Fulbright Distinguished Chair in the Department of Public Law and Tax Law at the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration, Vienna, Austria, for the 2011 winter semester.

The Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration has approximately 27,000 students who come from more than 30 countries.It is the largest university in the European Union for business, economics, law and social sciences. While there, Fleming will teach a course in U.S. international taxation and a seminar for doctoral students.

Distinguished Chairs are viewed as among the most prestigious appointments in the Fulbright Scholar Program. Appointees are required to be eminent scholars with a significant publication and teaching record.

The Financial Times has ranked the Vienna University as one of the top 50 European business schools, ranking No. 16 in 2009 for its master’s program in international business administration.

“The students and faculty at the Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration are very bright and among the best in Europe,” Fleming said. “My working with the doctoral students on their research and with the faculty on my own research will be a rich opportunity for me to learn from talented European scholars and to enhance my own understanding.”

Fleming has specialized in tax law at the J. Reuben Clark Law School since 1974.He was associate dean from 1986 to 2004 and has held the Ernest L. Wilkinson Chair since 1998.

"Professor Fleming has been a strength to the J. Reuben Clark Law School since 1974,” said Associate Dean Scott Cameron. “He has shared his expertiseinU.S. and international taxation with students andbeen a mentor to his faculty colleagues.We are confident thatthe students and faculty atthe Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration will benefit fromhisacademic expertise andhis abundant good will."

Fleming previously served as Fulbright Visiting Professor at the University of Nairobi, Kenya, and professor-in-residence in the Office of the IRS Chief Counsel in Washington, D.C., and has been a visiting professor at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; the University of Florida; Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; and is the Annual Visiting Professor. at the Central European University, Budapest, Hungary. He has published numerous articles and books.

The Fulbright Program is the flagship international educational exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government and is designed to “increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries.”

For more information, contact Tonya Fischio at (801) 368-0506 or visit www.cies.org.

Writer: Tonya Fischio

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