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Intellect

BYU Kennedy Center seeks couples to teach English in China

The David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies at Brigham Young University is seeking applications from qualified couples and individuals to teach at universities in the People's Republic of China.

Nearly 600 people have participated in the program since 1989. Although most have taught oral and written English, there is an increasing need for professionals with experience in the fields of business, law, economics, finance and other specialties. Chinese language skills are not required for placement.

Successful applicants must be active members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in good standing, age 69 or younger, in good health and in a secure financial situation. Applicants with an advanced degree are preferred. Because of housing limitations, couples with children are not accepted.

Completed applications for the academic year 2004–05 must be received by Feb. 13, 2004. For more information or to receive an application call (801) 422-2389, write to the China Teachers Program, David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies, 237 HRCB, BYU, Provo, UT 84602; email china-teach@email.byu.edu or visit the Web site at http://kennedy.byu.edu/partners/chinateachers.html.

Writer: Lee Simons

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