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Intellect

BYU hosts Writing for Young Readers Workshop June 13-17

The English Department and the Division of Continuing Education at Brigham Young University will host the sixth annual Writing for Young Readers Workshop Monday through Friday, June 13-17, at the Conference Center located northeast of the Marriott Center.

The public is invited to attend.

Tuition for the event is $399, and for students seeking credit there is an additional $40 fee. Included in the tuition are the workshops and a Thursday evening banquet.

The five-day workshop is designed for people who want to write for children or teenagers. In the daily four-hour morning workshops, participants will focus on a single market: picture books, book-length fiction (novels), fantasy/science fiction, nonfiction, general writing or beginning writing.

The afternoon workshop sessions will feature a variety of topics of interest to writers of all ages.

Two extended workshop sessions will be available on Saturday, June 18, allowing participants to spend a day with one of two guest editors who will be discussing the business of writing for publication. Enrollment for the Saturday session will cost an additional $60 and will be limited to 20 participants per editor.

For more information, contact Chris Crowe at (801) 422-3429 or go online at wfyr.byu.edu.

Writer: James McCoy

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