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Intellect

BYU hosts Mary Ellen Edmunds Nursing Endowment for the Healer’s Art Dinner April 9

Featuring LDS performer Kenneth Cope

Kenneth Cope, a popular Latter-day Saint composer, performer and producer, will be the guest speaker during this year’s Mary Ellen Edmunds Nursing Endowment for the Healer’s Art Dinner Wednesday, April 9, at 6:30 p.m. in the Wilkinson Student Center Ballroom at Brigham Young University.

Dinner reservations are $25 per person and may be scheduled by calling (801) 422-4143 before Thursday, April 3. Contributions to the Endowment Fund are encouraged and may be made in advance by calling (801) 422-4444, or at the event.

The celebration dinner will include remarks from Mary Ellen Edmunds and Kenneth Cope, who will also offer a musical performance. The event is held each year to honor the work of Edmunds and recognize the distinguishing mission of the BYU College of Nursing.

Edmunds was a member of the Relief Society General Board of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and previously served as a director of training at the Missionary Training Center in Provo. She also served several full-time proselyting and welfare missions to Asia and Africa.

The endowment was established in 2005, and all funds contributed benefit BYU nursing students by supporting programs that symbolize “the Healer’s art.”

For more information, contact Rose Ann Jarrett at (801) 422-4143.

Writer: David Luker

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