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Intellect

BYU hosts events in February celebrating Black History Month

Brigham Young University’s Multicultural Student Services will sponsor several events during February in celebration of Black History Month. The activities will highlight the theme, “Where Do We Go from Here?”

Friday, Feb. 20

• BYU’s Multicultural Student Services will host “Music Night and Poetry Jam: a Celebration of African-American Music” from 8 to 11 p.m. in the Wilkinson Student Center Ballroom. Tickets are $3 with a student ID and $4 without.

Thursday, Feb. 26

• Judge Shauna Graves-Robertson, the first African-American woman appointed to the Salt Lake County District Court, will address the theme of Black History Month at 11 a.m. in 3228 WSC.

Saturday, Feb. 28

• BYU’s Multicultural Student Services will host an African-American Children’s Fair, where African-American history and culture will be presented in a fun, interactive way. It will take place from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the WSC Ballroom. The event is focused on families with African-American children, but all are invited to attend.

For more information about Black History Month activities, contact Anthony Bates at (801) 422-4739, or visit multicultural.byu.edu.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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