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Intellect

BYU to host 12th annual International Law and Religion Symposium Oct. 2-4

Brigham Young University will host the International Law and Religion Symposium Sunday through Tuesday, Oct. 2-4, at the J. Reuben Clark Law School.

Continuing in a tradition that is now entering its 12th year, the BYU Law School will focus its conference on "Religion and the World’s Legal Traditions.”

Legal experts and government officials from Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Africa, the Pacific and North and South America will participate in the conference.

Sub-themes of the symposium include evolving models for relations of religion and state, religious law and secular legal systems, and the judiciary and religion in society.

Sponsors of the conference include the International Center for Law and Religion Studies, the J. Reuben Clark Law School and the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies at BYU in conjunction with the International Academy for Freedom of Religion and Belief and the Interdisciplinary Program in Law and Religion.

For information regarding the conference, hotel and program details, contact Deborah Wright at (801) 422-6842, or law_religion@byu.edu.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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