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BYU honors 13 with College Alumni Awards during Homecoming

Will deliver addresses Oct. 19

Thirteen Brigham Young University graduates whose significant professional accomplishments range from soil conservation and intricate heart surgery to award-winning music and water parks will be honored with College Alumni Awards during Homecoming 2006.

Most of the honorees will present a lecture in their college Oct. 19 at 11 a.m. The J. Reuben Clark Law School will have a lecture at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m, and the College of Biology and Agriculture recipient, Albert Francis Bahr of Orem, will receive his award at home.

For locations and a complete list of Homecoming activities, visit alumni.byu.edu.

  • For 35 years Albert F. Bahr (College of Biology and Agriculture) served as a soil conservation service specialist in North Dakota. Always supportive of BYU, he donated his personal soil science library and conservation slides, and he and his wife Louie Jean endowed a scholarship for plant and animal science majors.

  • Joseph Torgesen (David O. McKay School of Education) has had a distinguished career at Florida State University where he has led two major divisions in the psychology department and founded the Florida Center for Reading Research. President George W. Bush appointed the psychology professor to the National Board of Education Sciences.

  • When the world turned its attention to Utah for the 2002 Olympic and Paralympic Games, a key person in its success was Fraser Bullock (College of Family, Home and Social Sciences) of the Salt Lake Organizing Committee. As president and CEO, Bullock balanced a $1.31 billion budget and generated a $100 million profit, a financial turnaround from a $400 million deficit.

  • Emmy-winner Sam Cardon (College of Fine Arts and Communications) is a prolific composer whose credits include nine large-format films, including "Hearst Castle: Building the Dream," which he considers his best orchestral work. He provided music for the IMAX film, "Olympic Glory," and the 1988 and 2002 Olympic Games.

  • The arts in Oklahoma have been enhanced significantly through the efforts of Jamie Duncan Jacobson (College of Health and Human Performance). The 20-year director of dance at the University of Central Oklahoma received the (Oklahoma) Governor's Arts Award for her extensive contributions to dance in public schools, universities, and musical theater.

  • Former college valedictorian Athelia Tanner Woolley (College of Humanities) has distinguished herself as a mother, church leader, business associate and writer. Additionally, she volunteers as a hospice worker and juvenile court mediator. For five years she served on the Primary General Board of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

  • Douglas R. and Nancy P. Ferrell (Ira A. Fulton School of Engineering and Technology) specialize in the design of recreational water. Through their own company, Patrell Environmental Engineering (a combination of their last names, Patton and Ferrell) they work on swimming pools, water features, water parks and theme park elements.

  • Linda Goold (J. Reuben Clark Law School) has broken through the barriers of gender several times as a tax law and policy specialist in government, private practice, and as an industry advocate. Her current position puts her before Congress, the IRS and Treasury as the tax counsel for the National Association of Realtors.

  • James W. Parkinson's (J. Reuben Clark Law School) years of consistent vision, commitment and leadership have helped the J. Reuben Clark Law School considerably. His programs to enhance the student experience have included founding the Orrin G. Hatch Distinguished Trial Lawyer Series and constructing a plan for a Trial Advocacy Institute.

  • Douglas Reed Maughan (Marriott School of Management), a partner at PricewaterhouseCoopers, has been honored many times as the Southern California M&A Tax Leader. He generously supports his alma mater through the Marriott School where, among other boards, he has chaired the board of advisors to the School of Accounting.

  • Carol A. Bush (College of Nursing) selected a nursing career because of her desire to help others, and she has done this both as a practitioner and leader. Her leadership roles have included corporate nursing director for Intermountain Health Care and president of the Utah Organization of Nurse Executives.

  • After years of schooling, teaching and entrepreneurship, Dallan W. Quass (College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences) has established a non-profit organization, the Foundation for On-Line Genealogy. He hopes his free Web site, werelate.org, will help others search for their ancestors and share what they know about their personal heritage with others. Related stories:

    "Lighter of Lamps" theme for 2006 BYU Homecoming Activities

    Top BYU performers set for Homecoming Spectacular Oct. 19-20

    Alice Louise Reynolds is this year's founder honored at BYU Homecoming

    BYU adds centennial "Sunset on the Y" to Homecoming activities

    BYU to honor five during Homecoming 2006

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