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Intellect

BYU freshman missing since May 24, 2004

Brooke Wilberger is not forgotten

Brooke Wilberger, who was to have begun her second year at Brigham Young University last fall, has been missing since May 24, 2004. She disappeared while visiting family in Oregon.

The Corvallis Gazette-Times, in the Oregon town where she disappeared, reported recently: "The Corvallis Police Department is dispelling rumors that a green van associated with the Brooke Wilberger disappearance was found in Arizona, giving investigators what they needed to solve the case.

"We've always known where the van was," Corvallis Police Lt. Ron Noble said.

"About two weeks ago, the police department began asking for information about a 1997 green Dodge Caravan, possibly connected with Wilberger's disappearance on May 24, 2004. The van is associated with a person of interest in the case."

More information is available at her family's Web site.

Brooke Carol Wilberger is 5 feet, 4 inches tall and weighs 105 to 119 pounds. The Veneta woman was last seen May 24 wearing a T-shirt with "BYU Soccer" in small print; an indigo "Fresh Jive" sweatshirt; blue jeans and no shoes. She was wearing a ring engraved with the letters CTR, small hoop earrings and possibly a silver watch.

Anyone with information should call the Corvallis Police 24-hour tip line: 800-843-5678 (800-THE-LOST).

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