Skip to main content
Intellect

BYU forum July 15 to focus on innate immunity

Chemistry professor Paul Savage will speak at a Brigham Young University campus forum Tuesday, July 15, at 11:05 a.m. in the Joseph Smith Building Auditorium.

He will discuss “Winning the War Against an Innumerable Army: Protection Through Innate Immunity.” The public is welcome to attend.

The forum will be presented live on BYU Television, KBYU-TV, KBYU-FM and at byubroadcasting.org. For rebroadcast information, visit byubroadcasting.org.

Savage has been a member of the BYU faculty since 1995 and now serves as a professor and associate chair in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. His research focuses on membrane active antibiotics and special killer T cells that influence the body’s immunity to disease. He has authored or co-authored more than 90 science publications.

He received the BYU Karl G. Maeser Research and Creative Arts Award, the Excellence in Teaching Award and the Technology Transfer Award.

Savage has a bachelor’s degree from BYU, a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin and did postdoctoral research at Ohio State University.

Writer: Angela Fischer

savage.jpg

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
August 12, 2020
To date, Congress has authorized roughly $3 trillion in COVID-19 relief assistance— the largest relief package in history. With more COVID relief money on the way, a new study led by two Brigham Young University business professors finds these newly available funds led to a significant surge in health sector lobbying activity, especially within the pharmaceutical industry.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
August 05, 2020
Launched in January of 2016, the Cambodian Oral History Project works to collect and preserve the records of the Cambodian people.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
August 05, 2020
Because 60% of biology undergraduates nationwide are female, the life sciences have long been thought to enjoy more gender equity than other STEM fields. But a new BYU study challenges the notion that all is well for gender parity in biology classrooms.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=