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Intellect

BYU Folk Music Ensemble will present March 17 concert

Brigham Young University’s Folk Music Ensemble will fill the air with bluegrass sounds, folk music and old-time tunes Friday, March 17, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

Tickets are $9 with $3 off with a BYU or student ID. To purchase tickets, call the Fine Arts Tickets Office at (801) 422-4322 or visit performances.byu.edu.

Playing traditional American Cajun, bluegrass and country western music, the Folk Music Ensemble taps the roots of BYU's pioneer heritage to present a colorful display of harmony and rapid-fire instrumental work. The group features banjo, guitar, mandolin and fiddle solos, playing musical favorites from the 19th and 20th century.

Directed by Mark Geslison, BYU’s Folk Music is composed of seven talented instrumentalists and vocalists who sing and play a variety of traditional folk instruments, such as the fiddle, mandolin, banjo, dulcimer, guitar, bass, harmonica, accordion and Celtic drum.

Initially organized to accompany BYU's American Folk Dance Ensemble at international folk festivals throughout the world, the BYU Folk Music Ensemble has become a powerful performing group, entertaining audiences throughout the United States and the world.

For more information, contact Mark Geslison at (801) 422-3655.

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