Skip to main content
Intellect

BYU English student wins national prize in creative nonfiction

Stephen David Grover, a Brigham Young University senior and English major, is one of three winners of the Association of Writers and Writing Program’s Intro Journals Award in creative nonfiction.

Grover's essay, "On Trembling," which he wrote in an English 317R class, was selected from hundreds of entries written by undergraduates and graduates from all over the country. The entry, according to English professor Patrick Madden, “participates in the classical essay tradition in meditating on a subject from many angles and with many stories.”

"On Trembling" will be published in the literary journal "Artful Dodge."

Grover, originally from Sugar Land, Texas, plans to pursue a master's degree in English at Ohio University this fall.

The Association of Writers and Writing Programs seeks to foster literary talent and achievement and encourage the art of writing as essential to a complete education. Founded in 1967, the association continues to support creators, teachers, students and readers of contemporary writing.

For more information, contact Patrick Madden at (801) 422-6439.

Writer: Brooke Eddington

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
July 28, 2021
A team of BYU biologists has been tracking dragonflies around the world, from Vietnam to the islands of Vanuatu. Their goal is to piece together the first-ever phylogenic tree of all 6,300 known species and their ancestors.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 27, 2021
Amy Jensen, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications, delivered Tuesday’s forum address. She spoke on why our bodies matter in today’s digital world. More specifically, she explained that being more intentional about how we use and where we place our bodies can help us grow and cultivate a deeper understanding of others.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 25, 2021
New research finds that children who engaged with princess culture were more likely to hold progressive views about women and subscribe less to attitudes of toxic masculinity.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=