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Intellect

BYU English Department will host distinguished authors during February

The Brigham Young University English Department will host several award-winning authors for its Reading Series lectures on Fridays at noon during February in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium.

Admission is free and the public is welcome.

The lecture schedule is as follows:

  • Feb. 2 — Stephen Tuttle, an author known for his fiction and 20th century literature writing, will present the month’s first lecture. He earned a doctorate in literature and creative writing from the University of Utah in 2006. Tuttle’s works have appeared in numerous literary journals, including “Crazyhorse,” “Western Humanities Review” and “Cimarron Review,” and he has been the winner of the “Indiana Review” Fiction Prize, the Scowcroft Prize for Fiction and won first place in the Utah Writer’s Competition.

  • Feb. 9 — James Galvin received a bachelor’s degree from Antioch College and a master of fine arts from the University of Iowa. His works include several collections of poetry, including “Resurrection Update: Collected Poems 1975-1997,” “Lethal Frequencies” and “Imaginary Timber.” Galvin has also published works in prose and fiction. His honors include a Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Foundation award and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Ingram Merrill Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

  • Feb. 16 — Former biologist and textbook author Julie E. Czerneda will present this week’s lecture. Now an award-winning fiction author and editor, Czerneda’s recent works include “Mythspring,” “Under Cover of Darkness” and “Reap the Wild Wind.” She has also recently begun publishing under her own company, Star Ink Books, with the first title being “Polaris: A Celebration of Polar Science.” Czerneda also works as a science fiction consultant to “Science News for Kids” and often speaks on science fiction throughout Canada and the United States.

  • Feb. 23 — In addition to being the author of several poetry collections, this week’s speaker, Andrea Hollander Budy, serves as the writer-in-residence at Lyon College and will be the visiting poet-in-residence at Westminster College later in 2007. Her full-length collections include “Woman in the Painting,” “The Other Life” and “House Without a Dreamer.” Budy’s honors include the RUNES Poetry Award, a Pushcart Prize for memoir and the Porter Prize for Literary Excellence, as well as fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Arkansas Arts Council. For more information, contact Tessa Hauglid at (801) 422-4939.

    Writer: Elizabeth Kasper

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