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Intellect

BYU English Department hosts reading series in September

A chapter from the humorous novel "Love in the Land of Milk and Honey" will be read Friday, Sept. 10, to launch the Fall 2004 Reading Series hosted by Brigham Young University's English Department.

John S. Bennion, BYU faculty member and author of "Love in the Land of Milk and Honey," will be joined by Peter Sorensen, who will perform verbal imitations of famous leaders from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Readings take place each Friday at noon in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium and are free to the public.

The following are the readings in September:

Sept. 17 - Phillis Levin, author of "The Afterimage, Mercury, and Temples and Fields," and editor of "The Penguin Book of the Sonnet: 500 Years of Classic Tradition Taught in English."

Sept. 24 - Patrick Madden, whose doctoral dissertation is a collection of travel essays about Uruguay and master's thesis is a collection of personal essays from his mission for the Church of Jesus Christ in Uruguay.

A short reception with light refreshments will follow each reading. For more information about the series, contact Liz Liljenquist at el39@email.byu.edu.

Writer: Devin Knighton

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