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Intellect

BYU Concert Choir to perform works by Whitacre and Wilberg March 18

Brigham Young University School of Music’s Concert Choir, directed by Rosalind Hall, will perform a winter concert Saturday, March 18, at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

Tickets are $9 or $6 with BYU or student ID. To purchase tickets, call the Fine Arts Tickets Office at (801) 422-4322 or visit performances.byu.edu.

The performance will feature two large-scale, multi-movement works. “Five Hebrew Love Songs,” by Eric Whitacre will be accompanied by a string quartet.

“The choral world has been mesmerized by Whitacre’s fresh compositions,” said Hall. “This piece is about his falling-in-love experience with his Israeli wife told with colorful and passionate expressions.”

The Concert Choir will also perform “Dances to Life,” by Mack Wilberg, accompanied by percussion and piano. Each movement of the piece portrays a different stage of life from birth to death to immortal existence.

The ensemble will also sing three African-American spirituals, including “Didn’t My Lord Deliver Daniel” arranged by Bob Burrows, “Is There Anybody Here?” arranged by Alice Parker and “Ain’t That Good News” arranged by Mark Heyes.

The Concert Choir is one of four audition choirs at BYU, composed of 100 mixed voices of advanced singers. They sing a broad repertoire, ranging from choral classics to new contemporary compositions.

For more information, contact Rosalind Hall at (801) 422-2272.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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