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BYU community can join in Bike to Work Day activities May 15 and 16

Editor's note: An earlier version of this story contained inaccurate information about the May 16 schedule. The complete schedule for Bike Week is posted here: http://www.bikeprovo.org/event-calendar/

Provo City and the Utah Transit Authority invite the Brigham Young University community to join them during “Bike to Work Day” Tuesday, May 15, from 7:30 to 9 a.m. The event will take place at the west lawn of the Historic County Courthouse at 51 S. University Avenue and will include a special three- mile bike ride with Provo city Mayor John Curtis starting at 8 a.m.

Provo City will offer free bike registration, UTA will give away free bicycle helmets to the first 50 participants, and free food and complimentary bike tune-ups will be provided during the event. Also, Provo City will give away the best unclaimed bicycle from the city’s found property inventory.

A downloadable flier about “UTA Bike to Work” day can be accessed here. For more information about Bike Week, visit bikeprovo.org.

Writer: Preston Wittwer

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