Skip to main content
Intellect

BYU college, departments undergo name changes

Now College of Life Sciences, Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences, Department of Biology

Brigham Young University Academic Vice President John S. Tanner announced that the university has formally changed the name of the College of Biology and Agriculture to the College of Life Sciences.

Along with the college, two departments received new names.

The Department of Plant and Animal Sciences became the Department of Plant and Wildlife Sciences to include the sciences related to stewardship of the earth’s renewable natural resources.

The Department of Integrative Biology was renamed the Department of Biology to match its focus on general biology, ecology, population genetics and biological science education.

“The name College of Life Sciences includes all the programs in the college and points all of them forward into the vast and exciting future of the life sciences,” said Tanner.

The name changes more accurately define the restructured focus of the college and of these two departments, said Dean Rodney J. Brown.

“Over the past seven years, the college has moved away from production agriculture, recognizing that BYU-Idaho and the land-grant schools of Utah and neighboring states cover these disciplines,” said Brown.

“All the programs of the college have been refocused to prepare students for employment and graduate programs in the modern world of the life sciences,” he said. “These changes included a reduction from six to five departments, consolidation of 40 undergraduate programs into 21 programs and a 30 percent reduction in the number of courses taught.”

For more information, contact the College of Life Sciences at (801) 422-3963.

Writer: Cecelia Fielding

Related Articles

data-content-type="article"

BYU study shows changing population and income patterns in rural Mountain West

November 22, 2022
BYU professors Samuel Otterstrom and Matthew Shumway analyzed population and income trends in the Mountain West region over the past 20 years. Their research confirmed the widening inequalities between less wealthy “Old West” counties known for traditional mining, farming and ranching, and wealthier “New West” counties boasting natural beauty and recreational opportunities like hiking or skiing.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU students learn from the healthiest humans on earth in the blue zone of Ikaria, Greece

November 17, 2022
There are five locations around the globe where people reach the age of 100 at 10 times greater rates than U.S. averages. These Blue Zones, as they are called, are home to the healthiest people on earth:
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

How paperwork at the doctor's office can lead to medical misdiagnoses

November 16, 2022
While HIPAA privacy forms are supposed to assure patients that their personal information will be protected, new research from BYU and the University of Utah finds that they cause people to lie more about their medical history rather than feel more comfortable about sharing information.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=