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Intellect

BYU club plans staged reading of "Paradise Lost" Oct. 4-5

The Brigham Young University Experimental Theatre Club’s season opener will be a staged reading of “Paradise Lost” on Thursday and Friday, Oct. 4-5, at 8 p.m. in 3714 Harold B. Lee Library.

Admission to the event is free and the public is welcome to attend. Seating will begin at 7:30 p.m. and will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

“Paradise Lost” is considered by many to be one of the greatest literary works of the English language, and while it is frequently studied, it is rarely experienced in a theatrical setting, said director David Thorpe.

“I wanted to give students, professors and anyone else who’s interested the opportunity to experience this important text in a new way,” said Thorpe.

The Experimental Theatre Club is a student-run organization that focuses on providing practical experience in theatre to all BYU students while experimenting with unconventional genres and scripts not generally produced by the university.

For more information, contact David Thorpe at (801) 404-8477.

Writer: Aaron Searle

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