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Intellect

BYU chef wins silver medal at regional culinary challenge

A Brigham Young University banquet chef recently won a silver medal at the National Association of College and University Food Services Region VIII American Culinary Challenge.

Jonathan Davey, who works in Dining Services, competed against five other chefs at the Culinary Challenge in Calgary, Alberta.

Chefs were judged in four areas, including, knife skills, sanitization, organization, and taste and presentation. To prove his knife skills, Davey had to cut two ounces of food into perfect cubes that were measured to ensure exact length and width. The other three criteria were determined after Davey prepared a meal for four from scratch.

Before attending the California School of Culinary Arts, Davey was majoring in chemical engineering at BYU.

"I decided I would rather have fun at work," Davey said about his decision to study culinary arts. "I get paid to do my hobby."

Since graduation, Davey has completed an internship with the Sundance Tree Room Restaurant and worked with BYU Dining Services.

In January 2004, BYU will hold a culinary competition to determine a candidate to send on to the Region VIII competition. All BYU on-campus chefs are allowed to enter.

For more information, contact Shilo Mitchell at (801) 378-8064.

Writer: Liesel Enke

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