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Intellect

BYU broadcasters take second in Hearst competition

Brigham Young University's Department of Communication won second place in the Broadcast News division of the annual Hearst Journalism Awards Program, earning $5,000 of the total prize money.

The 2004-2005 prizes of $10,000, $5,000 and $2,500 were awarded to the top three colleges and universities in each division of the intercollegiate competitions, with the top 10 in each category receiving Hearst Medallions.

The Hearst program holds year-long competitions in writing, photography and broadcast news. Schools accumulating the most points earned by their students in each category are designated the winners.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program operates under the auspices of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication. It is fully funded and administered by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation.

More than 100 accredited undergraduate schools of journalism in the United States are eligible to participate in the program, which awards more than $400,000 in scholarships and grants annually.

Publisher Hearst established the William Randolph Hearst Foundation and The Hearst Foundation, Inc. a few years before his death in 1951. Since their inception, the foundations have awarded more than $450 million in grants and programs.

For more information, contact Ed Adams at (801) 422-1221.

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