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BYU anthropology funded for book on Native American rock art

The Brigham Young University anthropology department recently received a $1,500 grant from the Utah Preservation Initiatives Fund of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

The funds will be used to help publish "New Dimensions in Rock Art Studies," a publication outlining new discoveries and interpretations of Native American rock art, mainly on the Colorado plateau.

The book will be distributed by the University of Utah press and is scheduled to be ready by spring 2004.

"With these start-up dollars, Provo joins the hundreds of other communities across the country actively ensuring that America's architectural and cultural heritage is preserved," said Richard Moe, National Trust president.

The Utah Preservation Initiatives Fund administers the National Trust's program for awarding grants for local projects. Grants range from $500 to $10,000 and must be matched dollar for dollar with public or private funds. They are awarded to nonprofit groups and public agencies.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation is a nonprofit membership organization chartered by Congress to encourage public participation in all aspects of historic preservation.

For more information, call Ray Matheny at (801) 422-3058.

Writer: Thomas Grover

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