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Intellect

BYU Annual Giving Campaign "slam dunk" for student scholarships

While it was March Madness for the BYU men’s basketball team, it was March “Gladness” for Employee Giving.

According to Dallan Moody, chairman of the Employee Giving committee, 75 percent of campus employees participated in this year’s campaign, matching the university’s all-time record.

This effort reflects the loyalty and dedication employees feel toward BYU and its students, Moody said. “The $663,069 that employees gave this year will support student programs and scholarship opportunities. Employees embraced the idea of March ‘Gladness’ and the opportunity to make a difference at BYU.”

Employee Giving allows employees to directly influence students. Last year Physical Facilities established a special account for their employees to provide scholarships to their student employees. In one year, they contributed enough money to award seven $1,000 scholarships to deserving students.

These accomplishments and others were celebrated at the Employee Giving campaign luncheon on April 29. Student Auxiliary Services scholarship recipient Aubrianne Hilton spoke at the luncheon and thanked BYU employees for their help and support.

 “The sacrifices you have made have meant the world to me. I needed help and you were there, ready and willing to give,” said Hilton.

Also at the luncheon, Moody praised the efforts of committee members and the 135 volunteer representatives who spread the Employee Giving message in their departments.

“It’s the small things, the personal efforts of all of the campaign representatives along with the tremendous support from deans, directors, and department chairs that bring about the great things associated with Employee Giving,” he said.

Writer: Rick Stockton

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