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Intellect

BYU Alumni Association hosts Traditions Ball April 10

The Brigham Young University Alumni Association will be hosting the 2010 Traditions Ball Saturday, April 10, at 8 p.m. in the Gordon B. Hinckley Alumni and Visitors Center Assembly Hall.

Registration is limited and costs $15 per person or $25 per couple. Participants can register online at tinyurl.com/ytradis or by contacting the BYU Alumni Association at (801) 422-8659. Registration is open to the public.

This year’s event will feature tasty treats, live entertainment and BYU-themed memories.

“The Ray Smith Orchestra will be performing in the main lobby. They play everything from big band music to more modern stuff,” said director Curtis Isaak. “Upstairs we’ll have live acoustic music and a comedy group. They’ll also be serving fancy root beer floats.”

A photographer will also be available, and photos will be posted online for free downloading.

“We’ll also have ballroom dance instruction, tables with BYU memorabilia and old BYU yearbooks, hors d’oeuvres and the famous BYU mint brownies,” Isaak said.

Dress for the event is “blue-tie” formal.

“We’ve had people come in tuxedos and dresses and others in Sunday dress,” Isaak said. “You’re not required to wear a blue tie — but we wouldn’t recommend a red tie.”

For more information, contact Curtis Isaak at (801) 422-7621.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

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