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BYU Air Force cadets place second at national drill competition

Brigham Young University’s United States Air Force ROTC cadets ousted West Point for a second-place finish at one of the largest drill competitions in the nation.

The Southern California Invitational Drill Meet took place March 5-6 in Anaheim, Calif. More than 100 teams of junior and senior cadets and midshipmen from the Navy, Marines, Army and Air Force participated. The U.S. Air Force Academy placed first at the completion.

“USAF Academy, West Point and a couple of ROTC detachments from Oregon and Ohio were the main contenders this year,” said Col. Brent Johnson, BYU’s commander. “I feel the overall results reflect an accurate assessment, and I’m certain the USAF Academy’s victory was narrow.”

BYU placed first in the 12-person rifle exhibition and second in both the four-person rifle competition and 12-person rifle regulation.

“It's amazing to watch the professional U.S. Marine evaluators in action. Our BYU cadets were prepared for this very high caliber of evaluation standards,” Johnson said.

The BYU cadets finished up their trip by visiting Nellis and Creech Air Force Bases in Nevada and Los Angeles and March Air Force Base in California. They were able to visit the U.S. Air Force Thunderbird team and view demonstrations of remotely piloted vehicles.

For more information, contact Brent Johnson at (801) 422-7715.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

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