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Intellect

Broadcast students at BYU take second place at national Hearst competition

Broadcast students from the Department of Communications at Brigham Young University recently took second place in the Intercollegiate Broadcast News Competition of the Hearst Broadcast News Competition.

The other schools placing in the top five are highly ranked and endowed, making this win a big honor, said Ed Adams, chair of the Department of Communications. Rounding out the top five were Arizona State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Syracuse University and the University of Florida.

Additionally, two BYU students brought home honors in the individual competitions. Danielle Wood took second place in the radio division, earning a $1,500 prize and qualifying her for the upcoming semi-final competition, and Jennifer Borget placed 12th in the same category.

The Hearst Journalism Awards Program, a division of the William Randolph Hearst Foundation, was founded in 1960 to provide support, encouragement and assistance to journalism students at the university level. The program awards outstanding individual student performance and gives matching grants to the students' schools. For more information, contact Ed Adams at (801) 422-1221.

Writer: Elizabeth Kasper

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