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Intellect

Book co-edited by BYU English professor wins national honors

A book about first-year college writing requirements co-edited by a Brigham Young University professor was recently named winner of the 2012 Council of Writing Program Administrators Book Award.

“College Credit for Writing in High School: The ‘Taking Care of’ Business” is one of many works edited by Kristine Hansen, who teaches writing and rhetoric courses in the Department of English. Hansen co-edited the book with Christine Farris from Indiana University. The book highlights economic, social and political implications from the many early college credit programs available to high school students.

The book, which highlights pedagogical and professional concerns with early college credit, is aimed for an audience of administrators and policy makers to question the assumption that it is good to have students graduating high school with associate’s degree or a large amount of college credit.

Hansen and Farris wrote the introduction and a chapter each and then invited a dozen other leading scholars from across the country to contribute chapters.

Every two years, the Writing Program Administrators selects an outstanding book related to writing programs and program administration. Members of the Writing Program Administrators include directors of freshman composition and writing centers, as well as department chairs, division heads, deans and more.

The Writing Program Administrators are a part of the National Council of Teachers of English.

After receiving her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from BYU, Hansen was a doctoral student and an assistant instructor at The University of Texas-Austin. Upon completing her degree in 1987, she returned to BYU and has been teaching in the English department since that time.

For more information, contact Kristine Hansen at (80) 422-4775.

Writer: Preston Wittwer

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