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Intellect

Black fly topic for Bean Life Science Museum lecture March 7

Peter Adler, professor of entomology at Clemson University, will present a lecture Wednesday, March 7, at Brigham Young University's Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum. 

The lecture, “Blood Bath: Interactions of Black Flies and Wildlife,” will be held in the museum auditorium.  There will be a public reception at 6:30 p.m. followed by the lecture at 7 p.m. The event is free and the public is welcome to attend.

According to Adler, black flies feed on the blood of humans, cattle, horses and other livestock and wild mammals and birds.  Some can fly 7 to 10 miles from breeding sites looking for warm-blooded prey. Livestock and poultry as well as some wildlife are sometimes killed by large numbers of black flies.

Adler has taught at Clemson University since 1984.  His research is focused on the behavior, ecology, cytogenetics, and systematics of agriculturally and medically important arthropods. He is the author of the award-winning book "The Black Flies of North America" as well as more than scientific 230 articles and other books. 

For more information, contact Patty Jones, Bean Life Science Museum, patty_jones@byu.edu, 801-422-5053

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