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Intellect

Bassist Jeff Bradetich plans BYU guest recital April 17

Guest artist Jeff Bradetich, double bass, will perform Tuesday, April 17, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall in the Harris Fine Arts Center. His appearance is sponsored by the Brigham Young University School of Music, and admission is free.

The program will feature “Contrabajeando,” by Piazzolla; “Andante” from the Cello Sonata by Rachmaninoff; “Trio Beret, Beurre, Cornichons” from “L'Orchestre de ContreBasses” by Jean-Philippe Viret; two duos arranged by Eric Hansen, “Shenandoah” and “I Don't Love Nobody”; and “Nine Variants on Paganini” by Frank Proto.

Proclaimed by The New York Times as “the master of his instrument,” Bradetich is one of the leading performers and teachers of the double bass in the United States. Since his New York debut in Carnegie Recital Hall in 1982, he has performed more than 400 concerts on four continents, including his London debut in Wigmore Hall in 1986. He has won many major solo competitions, recorded six solo albums of music for double bass and piano and has been featured on CBS, CNN, BBC and NPR.

For more information, contact Eric Hansen at (801) 422-4135, or by e-mail at bass@byu.edu.

Writer: Brooke Eddington

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