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Intellect

Baroque violinist Robert Mealy to perform at BYU Jan. 10

Robert Mealy, one of America’s leading baroque violinists, and harpsichordist Avi Stein will be featured in a guest recital Thursday, Jan. 10, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall at Brigham Young University. Admission is free.

They will be joined for the performance by BYU faculty member Alexander Woods on baroque violin.

Mealy has been praised for his “imagination, taste, subtlety and daring” by the Boston Globe, and the New Yorker called him “New York’s world-class early music violinist.” He has recorded more than 50 CDs of early music on most major labels.

He directs the historical performance program at the Juilliard School and is a professor of early music at Yale Univeristy.

Stein teaches harpsichord, vocal repertoire and chamber music at Yale University and is the music director at St. Matthew & St. Timothy Episcopal Church in New York City. He is a much sought-after accompanist and is finishing his doctoral studies in organ and harpsichord at Indiana University.

For more information, contact Alexander Woods at (646) 483-6395.

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