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Intellect

Aulos Ensemble to present “Masters of the High Baroque” at BYU recital Feb. 8

Guest artists the Aulos Ensemble will present “Masters of the High Baroque” at Brigham Young University Friday, Feb. 8, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

Admission will be $17 or $10 with student ID. Tickets can be purchased at the Fine Arts Ticket Office, by calling (801) 422-7664 or by visiting byuarts.com/tickets.

The program will begin with Vivaldi's Concerto in G minor, followed by Bach’s Trio-Sonata in G major and François Couperin’s Concert No. 8 “Dans le Goût Théatral.”

Following an intermission, the group will play Handel’s Trio-Sonata in D minor, Opus 2, No. 6, and close the evening of Baroque music with Jean-Phillipe Rameau’s Suite from “Les Indes Galantes.”

The Aulos Ensemble was formed in 1973 by five graduates of the Juilliard School: Christopher Krueger, flute traverso; Marc Schachman, baroque oboe; Linda Quan, baroque violin; Myron Lutzke, baroque cello; and Arthur Haas, harpsichord.

The group’s accomplishments over the past four decades have given it pre-eminence in the early music movement and established the ensemble’s five musicians as highly acclaimed and celebrated presenters of European Baroque music traditions.

For more information, visit www.aulos.org or contact Ken Crossley at (801) 422-9348.

 

 

 

 

Writer: Hwa Lee

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