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Intellect

April Clayton to present faculty flute recital Nov. 14

Brigham Young University’s School of Music presents a faculty flute recital by April Clayton Saturday, Nov. 15, at 7:30 p.m. in the Gordon B. Hinckley Alumni and Visitors Center Auditorium.

Admission is free and the public is welcome to attend.

The faculty recital will feature fellow faculty members Monte Belknap, Julie Bevan, Claudine Bigelow and Jeffrey Shumway, as well as guest artists Christopher Clayton and Lysa Rytting.

Clayton will perform “Assobio a jato” by Heitor Villa-Lobos, the Flute Quartet No. 1 in D Major, K285 by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, “Chansons Madécasses” by Maurice Ravel and the Sonata for Flute, Viola and Harp by Achille-Claude Debussy.

An associate professor in the School of Music, Clayton attended Oberlin College as a National Merit Scholar and completed her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music. At age 21, she was the youngest student ever admitted to the doctoral program at The Juilliard School, where she received her doctor of musical arts degree in May 2001.

She has performed in Italy's Palazzo dei Congressi, Germany’s Leipzig Gewandhaus, Moscow's Rachmaninoff Hall, as well as prestigious venues in Brazil, Mexico, South Korea and New York City, including Carnegie Hall.

For more information, contact April Clayton at (801) 422-1177.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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