Skip to main content
Intellect

Annual BYU Hunger Banquet March 6-7 to spotlight global income disparity

Brigham Young University’s Students for International Development will host the 19th Annual Hunger Banquet Friday and Saturday, March 6-7, in the Wilkinson Student Center Terrace.

Tickets go on sale Monday, March 2, for $7 at the WSC Information Desk, $6 with a college-level textbook published within the last seven years to donate, or $8 at the door. The event is open to the public.

Attendees will be randomly assigned to sit in a high-, middle- or low-income geographical area and provided a meal corresponding to their assigned income class, creating a visual and culinary representation of the global wealth disparity.

This year's banquet will include speakers who understand the issues faced by all involved in international development and how to engage in helping with these issues.

All proceeds from the event will be donated to student-selected aid organizations operating across the globe to relieve the suffering of those in need. Past recipients include Sowers of Hope, Koins for Kenya, Kedesh, Reforestation and Turn International.

For more information, see the Web site at kennedy.byu.edu/student/SID, or contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Writer: Angela Fischer

hunger.jpg

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
July 27, 2021
Amy Jensen, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications, delivered Tuesday’s forum address. She spoke on why our bodies matter in today’s digital world. More specifically, she explained that being more intentional about how we use and where we place our bodies can help us grow and cultivate a deeper understanding of others.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 25, 2021
New research finds that children who engaged with princess culture were more likely to hold progressive views about women and subscribe less to attitudes of toxic masculinity.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
July 21, 2021
Immigrant communities such as a Finnish settlement in Scofield and a Chinese community in Salt Lake City may not be as well-known or remembered but still play an important part of Utah’s history — a history rich with diverse stories of faith and perseverance.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=