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Intellect

Annual BYU Early Breast Cancer Detection Campaign now under way

Registration is now available for Brigham Young University Human Resource Services’ 15th Annual Early Breast Cancer Detection Campaign, March 5-28.

BYU has arranged with Deseret Mutual Benefit Administrators and Utah Valley Regional Medical Center to provide this service for all female personnel and spouses of male personnel with DMBA health care plans. Mammogram screenings cost approximately $200, of which Deseret Choice and Deseret Select participants will be billed 10 percent and Deseret Value participants will be billed 30 percent. Altius is not included in this offering.

Screenings will be conducted in the Women's Center located in the main lobby of UVRMC. Appointments for the mammograms may be made online at wellness.byu.edu (click on “Events”). Once registration is full, appointments can be made directly by calling the UVRMC scheduling office at (801) 357-7871. Callers should indicate that they are from BYU.Highlights Body:

For additional information, call Carol Tate at (801) 422-5723.

Writer: Marissa Ballantyne

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