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Intellect

Annual BYU Adventssingen at Provo Tabernacle Dec. 6

Brigham Young University’s annual Adventssingen, a concert of traditional European Christmas music celebrating the Advent of the Nativity, will be presented Sunday, Dec. 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the Provo Tabernacle. Admission is free.

The Adventssingen will feature music from Austria, Germany and Switzerland performed by the BYU German choir and traditional Austrian folk music groups, as well as members of the community. This year, a choir made up of BYU faculty member’s children will sing during the celebration.

This event is sponsored by BYU’s Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and it is for German and non-German speakers.

Throughout the evening, the Christmas story will be read in German. Non-German speakers are encouraged to bring an English Bible to follow along with the story. Participants will dress in native clothing, and the tabernacle will be adorned with traditional decorations from the three countries.

In the Roman Catholic tradition, Advent focuses on the spiritual preparation for the Nativity of Jesus during the four weeks leading up to the holiday.

For further information, contact program director Kathryn Isaak at (801) 422-2376 or at kathryn_isaak@byu.edu.

Writer: Ricardo Castro

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