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Intellect

40 pictures from Mark Philbrick's 40-year photography career

Mark A. Philbrick retires this month after an incredible 40-year career as the university photographer. 

To mark the occasion, we've chosen 40 pictures (among millions of options) to share in this slideshow. 

In a 2008 devotional, President Cecil O. Samuelson recognized Mark as an "unsung hero" of the university.

"He is equally comfortable capturing with his cameras the images of prophets, performers, and players—all the while recognizing that his service to Brigham Young University is his focus, rather than any recognition that might rightfully accrue to him," Samuelson said.

But the recognition for his talents came anyway. Mark's photos of BYU earned him the distinction as the nation's top university photographer an unprecedented eight times. With Mark retiring this year, the University Photographer's Association of America decided to put his name on the award permanently, naming it The Mark A. Philbrick Photographer of the Year. 

This month Mark hands the reins to his protege, Jaren S. Wilkey. 

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