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Intellect

38th annual BYU Counseling Workshop March 1-2 to focus on Hispanic population

The Brigham Young University Counseling and Career Center and the Department of Conferences and Workshops will host the 38th Annual Counseling Workshop Thursday and Friday, March 1 and 2, at the BYU Conference Center.

This year’s workshop is designed to help mental health professionals develop or enhance their counseling, teaching, supervising and mentoring knowledge about working with Hispanic people, said Chrystine Whyte, program administrator.

Registration may be completed in person at 348 Harman Continuing Education Building, by phone at (801) 422-2568 or online at ce.byu.edu. Workshop attendees will be eligible to earn university credit for an additional fee.

The workshop’s keynote address will be given by Luis A. Vázquez, head of the Counseling and Educational Psychology Department at New Mexico State University. He will speak on “Providing Services to Latino Populations in Mental Health and School Settings: Enhancing Our Cultural Competencies.”

Thursday’s schedule will begin at 8:30 a.m. and wrap up at 6 p.m. and Friday’s will run from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. In addition to Vázquez’s remarks, workshop sessions will discuss the history of Latino psychology, interpreter and translation issues and clinical issues.

“By 2005, approximately 23 percent of persons living in Salt Lake City, Utah, were of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity, and Hispanic or Latino persons made up approximately 11 percent of the statewide population, according to the American Community Survey,” said Whyte.

“This workshop will increase participants' awareness of acculturation and identity development issues among Latino and Hispanic persons as a group, and increase participants' skills for making appropriate interventions as counselors or teachers,” she said.

For more information, contact Continuing Education at (801) 422-2568.

Writer: Elizabeth Kasper

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