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Zagreb Saxophone Quartet with Eugene Rousseau to perform at BYU Oct. 30

Brigham Young University will host Croatia’s world-renowned ensemble, the Zagreb Saxophone Quartet with special guest Eugene Rousseau, presenting music ranging from Baroque to 20th century Wednesday, Oct. 30, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

Tickets are $13, $10 for BYU alumni or senior citizens and $8 with a student ID or BYU employee ID. To purchase tickets, call the Fine Arts Ticket Office at (801) 422-2981 or visit byuarts.com.

The Zagreb Saxophone Quartet is renowned for its exceptional musicality, interpretative focus and technical supremacy and has performed in more than 20 countries since the quartet’s formation in 1989. Graduates of the Zagreb Academy of Music in Croatia, the quartet features Dragan Sremec on the soprano saxophone, Goran Merčep on the alto saxophone, Saša Nestorović on the tenor saxophone and Matjaž Drevenšek on the baritone saxophone.

After a five-year absence, the group returns to BYU with master saxophonist Eugene Rousseau and will be accompanied by BYU faculty artist Jeffrey Shumway, piano. With a repertoire ranging from Bach to Gershwin and Mozart to Bernstein, Croatia’s esteemed classical woodwind ensemble has become a premier interpreter of new and established works for saxophone.

The quartet's repertoire includes pieces originally written for saxophone quartets, as well as arrangements of pieces by various composers of different periods, ranging from the Baroque, including Bach and Purcell, to the 20th century, including Piazzola, Glass and Gershwin. In addition, the ensemble's performances have inspired Croatian composers, including Bjelinski, Detoni and Glassl, to dedicate their pieces to the quartet.

For more information, contact Ken Crossley at (801) 422-9348.

Writer: Brett Lee

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