Skip to main content
Intellect

Work-order software Sprocket topic for BYU conference May 12-14

The basics of facility management using the online work-order system Sprocket will be discussed during the Brigham Young University Sprocket Conference Monday through Wednesday, May 12-14.

Registration is $699, which includes presentation handouts, a certificate of attendance and daily breakfast, lunch and snacks. Registration is available until Wednesday, May 7, at 5 p.m. Mountain Time. Participants may register in person in the lobby of the BYU Harman Continuing Education Building, by phone at (801) 422-8925 or online at ce.byu.edu/cw/sprocket.

The Sprocket Conference will cover the basics of facility management as it pertains to the use of the Sprocket program. The conference is geared toward current users of the software, but will be a useful training and networking event for all facility managers.

Topics that will be covered at the conference include work management, online work order requests, preventative maintenance, inventory management, inspections, mobile devices, e-mail notifications and reporting.

The workshop will be held at the BYU Conference Center located on the corner of 900 East and University Parkway in Provo. Ample parking is available free of charge in the lot west of the Conference Center.

For more information, visit ce.byu.edu/cw/sprocket or call BYU Conferences and Workshops at (801) 422-4853.

Writer: Irasema Romero

Related Articles

data-content-type="article"

Teaching kids about money pays off — in finances and relationships, BYU study shows

January 13, 2022
A new study from BYU discovered that children who learn proper money management behavior from their parents have more fulfilling relationships with their significant others in young adulthood.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU researchers sequenced the quinoa genome. Now they’re introducing hybrids of the crop to developing nations

January 11, 2022
As soils across the world become less fertile and more desert-like due to climate change, it’s getting harder for farmers, especially those in developing nations, to grow basic life-preserving crops such as corn, wheat and rice.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Top 10 BYU News Stories of 2021

December 29, 2021
The most-read BYU News stories of the year include research on internet trolling, advances in holography, the formation of the new Office of Belonging, and the many ways students and faculty have strengthened one another as they continue to persevere through a pandemic.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=