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Winner of 2003 Lewis Playwriting Contest at BYU announced

The winner of Brigham Young University's 2003 Arlene R. and William P. Lewis Playwriting Contest for Women is Faye Sholiton of Beachwood, Ohio.

Sholiton's winning entry, "V-E Day," will be announced at a Writer's Forum featuring Tony Award-winning playwright David Edgar and sponsored by the BYU Department of Theatre and Media Arts Friday, Oct. 31, at 3 p.m. in the Nelke Experimental Theatre.

The idea for "V-E Day" was born more than a decade ago when Sholiton was given a box of old newsletters dating from World War II.

"I wrote 'V-E Day' thinking it was going to be about the dashed hopes of my parents' generation," she said. "After it was written, I discovered it was, in fact, a love story, as well as an exploration of the choices we make, and the consequences of our actions."

The play will be performed in a staged reading at the Cleveland Play House Next Stage Festival in November 2003, followed by a full production at Dobama Theatre in Cleveland through December.

Sholiton is a member of the Playwrights' Unit at the Cleveland Play House, where she has developed her work since 1996.

For more information about Faye Sholiton or the 2004 Lewis Playwriting Contest for Women, contact Elizabeth Funk, (801) 422-7768 or Elizabeth_funk@byu.edu.

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