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William Mathis to present guest trombone recital Feb. 12 at BYU

Will premiere “Force of the Mind” by BYU composition professor Steven Ricks

Guest artist William Mathis will perform in a free trombone recital at Brigham Young University Saturday, Feb. 12, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall. Mathis is chair of music performance studies at Bowling Green State University.

Mathis will be performing six trombone pieces with accompanist Robin Hancock on the piano. The recital will begin with Concerto in B-flat, Op. 7, No. 3, by Tomaso Albinoni; followed by Variations by Léon Stekke; Paquito D’Rivera’s “Danzón” assisted by BYU’s Jaren Hinckley on the clarinet; Claude Debussy’s “Beau Soir” and “Romance”; and a modern piece called “Patterns and Poses” by Steven Paxton.

The finale work on the program is “Force of the Mind” by BYU composition professor Steven Ricks written specifically for Mathis and BYU trombone professor Will Kimball.

“Force of the Mind” has been performed at the Eastern Trombone Workshop in Washington, D.C., and in the Bowling Green New Music Festival. However, Mathis’ recital at BYU will be the work’s Utah premiere. As part of the performance, a sculpture by BYU visual arts faculty member Brian Christensen will also be featured.

Mathis received his bachelor’s degree from Wichita State University and his master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Michigan. He has served for 13 years as professor of low brass at Northwestern State University of Louisiana and has performed with the Glass City Brass Quintet, the Shreveport Symphony, the International Brassfest, the International Trombone Festival and the New York Brass Conference.

For more information about this recital, contact Ken Crossley at (801) 422-9348 or ken_crossley@byu.edu, or visit byuarts.com.

Writer: Philip Volmar

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