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Intellect

What’s New at BYU for November 2005

Tuesday, Nov. 1

K. Richard Young of the McKay School of Education will speak at 11:05 a.m. in the Marriott Center for a campus devotional. It will be broadcast on the KBYU networks. Rebroadcast information is available at www.byubroadcasting.org.

Wednesday, Nov. 2

Blair Van Dyke, Lone Peak seminary principal and part-time instructor at Brigham Young University, will present a Global Awareness Lecture titled “From Constantinople to Jerusalem: A History of the Latter-day Saints in the Near East” at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Thursday, Nov. 3

David Nelson of the Marriage, Family and Human Development Department will speak Thursday, Nov. 3, at noon in 1063G Joseph Fielding Smith Building as part of the BYU Women’s Studies Colloquium. He will discuss relational aggression in children.

Ronen Sen, Indian ambassador to the United States, will present an Area Focus Lecture, “India-U.S. Relations,” at 11 a.m. in 250 Spencer W. Kimball Tower.

Ruth Stern, professor of health promotion and Equity Gauge initiative coordinator at the University of the Western Cape, will present an Area Focus Lecture titled “Research to Action—The Experience of Cape Town Equity Gauge” at 3 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Sunday, Nov. 6

President Thomas S. Monson will speak at 6 p.m. in the Marriott Center for a Church Educational System fireside. It will be broadcast live on BYU-Television, BYU-Radio and online. Rebroadcast information is available at www.byubroadcasting.org.

Tuesday, Nov. 8

Carri Jenkins of University Communications will speak Tuesday, Nov. 8, at 11:05 a.m. in the Marriott Center for a campus devotional. It will be broadcast on the KBYU networks. Rebroadcast information is available at www.byubroadcasting.org.

Wednesday, Nov. 9

Kassahun Ayele, Ethiopian ambassador to the United States, will present a Global Awareness Lecture titled “Ethiopia-U.S. Relations” at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Thursday, Nov. 10

The film “Jeanette Rankin” will be shown at noon in 1063G Joseph Fielding Smith Building as part of a Women’s Studies Film Series.

Jenny Pulsipher, professor of history, will lecture on “Useful Myths: The Meaning of Thanksgiving in American History” at 5 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium.

For more information about the American Studies Lecture Series, please contact Jenny Chiu at american_studies@byu.edu.

Monday, Nov. 14

BYU International Services and the Kennedy Center will host a celebration of international cultures and peoples during International Education Week Monday, Nov. 14, through Friday, Nov. 18. For more information, visit http://kennedy.byu.edu/events/IEW.

Tuesday, Nov. 15

Elder Robert D. Hales will speak at 11:05 a.m. in the Marriott Center for a campus devotional. It will be broadcast on the KBYU networks. Rebroadcast information is available at www.byubroadcasting.org.

“From the Masses to the Masses,” a one-hour documentary screening will be shown at 3 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building. The film will be followed by a question and answer period with the producer and director. For more information, visit http://kennedy.byu.edu/events/IEW.

Wednesday, Nov. 16

Ross Terrill, associate in research for the Fairbank Center for East Asian Research at Harvard University, will present a lecture on the International Education Week Book of the Semester “What Does China Want?” at noon in the Joseph Smith Building Auditorium.

Thursday, Nov. 17

Eric Dusteler of the History Department will speak at noon in 1063G Joseph Fielding Smith Building as part of the BYU Women’s Studies Colloquium. He will discuss “Gender and Boundaries in the Early Modern Mediterranean.”

Photo and Essay Contest winners will be recognized at the International Education Week Awards Reception at 11 a.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Tuesday, Nov. 29

Terryl Givens of the University of Richmond will speak at 11:05 a.m. in the Marriott Center for a campus forum. It will be broadcast on the KBYU networks. Rebroadcast information is available at www.byubroadcasting.org.

Wednesday, Nov. 30

Yvette Donosso Diaz, executive director of Community and the Arts in the Utah Governor’s Office, will present a Global Awareness Lecture titled “Utah's Growing Ethnic Diversity: Challenges and Opportunities” at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

All month:

Complimentary tours of the BYU campus are available weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the BYU Visitors Center. For more information, call (801) 422-4678.

An English reading lecture series will take place every Friday at noon in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium during the fall semester. All are invited to attend, especially English major students and those interested in writing, poetry and prose. For more information, contact the Humanities Librarian, Robert Means, at (801) 422-6117 or visit the Library’s website www.library.byu.edu.

L. Tom Perry Special Collections at the Harold B. Lee Library continues its exhibition titled "Looking Inward, Looking Outward: Japanese Representations of Self and Other" in the Special Collections gallery. The exhibit displays work of art, literature and artifacts from Japan from the eighth through the 20th centuries. Admission is free. The exhibit is located on the first level of the library and is available for viewing weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

L. Tom Perry Special Collections at the Harold B. Lee Library continues an exhibition that explores “Don Quixote’s Library” and the history of reading in the Special Collections gallery. The exhibit celebrates the 400th anniversary of the publication of the first part of Miguel de Cervantes’ story of “Don Quixote,” whose obsession with literature led to his downfall as he mixed reality and fantasy, as well as truth and falsehood. The exhibit focuses on Don Quixote’s “reading wheel,” a specific reading practice that involves comparing and contrasting information to gain knowledge. Admission is free. The exhibit is located on the first level of the library and is available weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Earth Science Museum is displaying "Torvosaurus Tanneri," a large, carnivorous dinosaur. The museum also features two fully mounted skeletons of a camptosaurus and an allosaurus, a mural of the Utah-Colorado region in the Jurassic period, a 150-million-year-old dinosaur egg and a preparation lab window showing museum personnel preparing fossils. Visitors may touch real fossils at the fossil touch table and see a unique diceratops skull. Admission is free. The Earth Science Museum is located at 1683 North Canyon Road in Provo. The museum is open Mondays through Fridays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturdays from noon to 4 p.m. For more information, call (801) 422-3680.

Through the generosity of Fred and Sue Morris of Salt Lake City, the world's most complete collection of waterfowl and pheasants is being exhibited as part of the Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum's permanent collection. The Don Cox Wildlife Collection is on display in the third floor exhibit gallery. A life-size African elephant is on display for about one year. Other exhibits on display include a new butterfly exhibit and a shell exhibit, "Ecosystem Dioramas," "Africa: A Diverse Continent" and "Synoptic Collections of Vertebrate Animals.” Gallery shows for the public featuring reptiles are conducted Mondays at 6:30 and 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays at 1:30 p.m. "Saturday Safari,” a discovery program at the museum tailored to children between ages 5 and 10, costs $8 per child per class. It focuses on teaching about animals, plants and the world around them. Classes are Saturday mornings from 9:30 a.m. to noon. The museum, located southeast of the Marriott Center, is open Mondays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call (801) 422-5051 for more information.

The Museum of Peoples and Cultures, located at 700 North 100 E. in Provo, has a new exhibit titled "Rise Up from Fragments: Life and Arts of the Western Anasazi." The exhibit features artifacts made and used by the Western Anasazi, a branch of ancestral Pueblo people who lived near Kanab, Utah. It will be on display until April 2006. Another new exhibition titled “Seeking the Divine: Ritual, Prayer and Celebration” explores rituals and ceremonies that empower people to seek the divine through more than 150 artifacts from countries around the world. It will be on display through April 2007. The museum offers tours and teaching kit programs as well. The teaching kits are provided as supplementary resources for teaching anthropology in Utah. The museum also offers volunteer opportunities. Museum hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. For more information, call (801) 422-0020.

The BYU Astronomical Society is presenting public shows each Friday night at the Eyring Science Center. The cost is $2 per person and the event is open to the public. For more information and a complete schedule, visit planetarium.byu.edu.

BYU Conferences and Workshops offers a number of programs for adults, youth and children throughout the year. For information regarding sports and dance camps, education workshops, scholars' academy and mothers-and-daughters camps, call (801) 422-3559. To learn more about prep courses for the ACT, GMAT, GRE and LSAT exams, call (801) 422-4853. For additional information about other upcoming offerings, visit the Web site at ce.byu.edu/cw.

The Counseling and Career Center at BYU offers workshops in choosing a major and career, financial management, listening and note-taking skills, overcoming procrastination, stress management, options for exploring graduate schools and test preparation. For more information, contact the Counseling and Career Center at (801) 422-2689 or visit the Web site at www.byu.edu/ccc/calendar.

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