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Intellect

Visitor to discuss indigenous communities of Chihuahua at BYU lecture Feb. 20

Horacio Echavarría González will present “Pobreza entre las Pueblos Indigenas de Chihuahua” at a David M. Kennedy Center Lecture on Friday, Feb. 20, at 2 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building. The lecture will be given in Spanish.

This lecture is part of the “Conference on Poverty and Development in Indigenous Communities: The Case of the Tarahumara.”

Echavarría works among the indigenous communities in the Sierra Tarahumara of Chihuahua, where he focuses on the environmental impact of economic activities and the social conditions of the population.

For the past ten years, he has been a researcher at the Centro de Estudios Multidisciplinarios en Investigacion Intercultural, an organization where he now serves as president. Licensed in social sciences, with a master’s degree in educational research, Echavarría has provided service in public and private schools for twenty-seven years.

This lecture will be archived online. For more information on David M. Kennedy Center events, please see the web site at kennedy.byu.edu. For more information about this lecture, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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