Skip to main content
Intellect

Vice president of Ecuador Alfredo Palacio at BYU lecture March 18

Vice president and former minister of health of the Republic of Ecuador Alfredo Palacio will address Brigham Young University students and faculty Thursday, March 18, at 3 p.m. in 2084 Jesse Knight Humanities Building.

He will discuss health care in Ecuador and Latin America.

In addition to his national duties, Palacio is director of the National Institute of Cardiology in Guayaquil, Ecuador, and principal professor of cardiology at the University of Guayaquil.

He was previously president and vice president of the Ecuadorean Scientific Committee, regional director of the Ecuadorean Institute of Social Security and Ecuador's Minister of Health in the government of former President Sixto Durán-Ballen from 1992-96.

It was during his time as minister of health that Palacio became acquainted with President Lucio Gutierrez. In 2002, the two men joined forces on an anticorruption campaign platform, which resulted in their election in 2003.

Following graduation in medicine and surgery from the University of Guayaquil School of Medicine in 1969, Palacio specialized in internal medicine and cardiology at several U.S. hospitals.

Palacio completed medical residencies at Mt. Sinai and Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, followed by a two-year cardiology fellowship at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

He is a fellow of the American College of Cardiology, Physicians and Chest Physicians; a founding member of the Colombian Society of Cardiology; and a member of the New York Academy of Science.

Palacio's father sculpted the monument in Guayaquil to Eloy Alfaro, former revolutionary and twice president of Ecuador.

His lecture is sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. For more information, please contact David Laraway, (801) 422-3807.

Writer: Lee Simons

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
October 14, 2020
Catastrophic fires in the West are burning hotter than ever, leaving paths of destruction through both human development and native plant ecosystems. Seed coating technology from BYU is helping restore native plant systems.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
October 13, 2020
A new BYU study, published in the journal Vaccines, shows that 68% of respondents are supportive of being vaccinated for COVID-19, but concerns remain about side effects, sufficient vaccine testing and vaccine effectiveness.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
October 08, 2020
Water modeling software created by BYU researchers can predict the rise and fall of every river on the face of the planet. Those streamflow forecasts are now being made available to agencies worldwide to deal with water emergencies.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=