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Intellect

Utah Symphony trombonist Larry Zalkind to present BYU recital Oct. 11

Brigham Young University’s School of Music welcomes Larry Zalkind, principal trombonist with the Utah Symphony, who will present a recital Tuesday, Oct. 11, at 5:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

Admission is free and the public is welcome to attend.

Zalkind will perform a wide variety of songs, with selections by Tommy Dorsey, George Frederic Handel, Gordon Jacob, Fritz Kreisler, George Bassman, Carl Maria von Weber and Michael Davis.

A regular member of Summit Brass and the Grand Teton Music Festival, Zalkind has performed and recorded with the Chicago, Atlanta and St. Louis Symphonies. He has also been featured as soloist with the Fairbanks, Southwest, West Los Angeles, Billings, Twin Falls, Macon, and Central Oregon Symphonies.

Having recorded two highly acclaimed CDs, Zalkind is also in demand around the world as soloist and clinician.

Zalkind studied at the University of Southern California, where he received bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music. Currently an adjunct professor of trombone at the University of Utah, he also teaches at Westminster College.

For more information, contact Will Kimball at (801) 422-2375.

Writer: Brian Rust

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