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Intellect

Utah artist Brian Kershisnik work on display at BYU's Lee Library gallery

Brian Kershisnik, a popular Utah artist, created a new exhibition, "Dogs with Paintings of Women," which will be on display Nov. 18-Dec. 31 in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium gallery at Brigham Young University.

The display is typical of Kershisnik and his previous artwork. His pieces are influenced by human interaction and experiences he has had in his own life.

"My artwork is not so much a visualization of an ideal, as it is an exploration of the process that leads to an ideal, the often awkward practicing, the occasional detours and lost ground, as well as the triumph of joy," Kershisnik said.

"My paintings emerge from my love and faith, my fears and awkwardness, from my euphoria and failures together. My paintings emerge from living with people (and my dog) and from affection for the processes I use to make pictures."

Kershisnik graduated from BYU and was able to study abroad in London for six months during his college career. He grew up in Angola, Thailand, Texas and Pakistan. He currently lives with his family in Kanosh, Utah, where he continues to paint.

For more information contact Christiane Ramsey at (801) 422-6731.

Writer: Rebekah Hanson

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