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Intellect

U.S. withdrawal from Iraq topic for BYU lecture Jan. 11

The Brigham Young University David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies presents Dodge Billingsley, director of Combat Films and Research, as he lectures on “Closing Iraq: Anatomy of Withdrawal” Wednesday, Jan. 11 at noon in 238  Herald R. Clark Building.

Billingsley, who has lectured many times at BYU, founded Combat Films and Research in 1997, and since then he has found himself covering conflicts around the world. In 2002 he won the Rory Peck award and the Royal Television Society award for Best Feature for his documentary, “House of War,” which documented the battle for Qala Jangi fortress in Afghanistan.

He received a bachelor's degree in history from Columbia University and a master's degree in war studies from King’s College Department of War Studies in London.

This lecture will be archived at kennedy.byu.edu/archive. For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 or lee_simons@byu.edu. 

Writer: Charles Krebs

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