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Intellect

U.S. civil rights struggle subject of BYU lecture Nov. 5

Rebecca de Schweinitz, a professor of history at Brigham Young University, will be presenting “Civil Rights Stories: Childhood, Brown and America’s Struggle for Racial Equality,” at an American Studies Lecture Thursday, Nov. 5, at 11 a.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library Auditorium.

De Schweinitz will be speaking on one of the chapters from her latest book, “If We Could Change the World: Young People and America's Long Struggle for Racial Equality” (2009), which offers a new perspective on the civil rights movement by bringing children and youth to the center of the movement.

Her research specializes in the history of U.S. children, women and gender, as well as African American history. Her publications include, “The ‘Shame of America’: African-American Civil Rights and the Politics of Childhood” and “Preaching the Gospel of Church and Sex: Mormon Women's Fiction in the LDS Young Woman's Journal, 1889-1910.”

She holds a bachelor’s degree in history from BYU and master's and doctoral degrees in U.S. history from the University of Virginia.

For more information about the lecture, contact Rebecca de Schweinitz at (801) 422-1594.

Writer: Ricardo Castro

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